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January 9th, 2024, is Static Electricity Day!


Static electricity can have various effects, such as the attraction or repulsion of objects, sparks, and electric shocks. It is responsible for everyday phenomena like hair sticking to a comb, clothes clinging together, and lightning.


It can also be a fun science topic to learn about!


Check out these cool but easy static electricity experiments below!




Magic Butterfly

Materials:

  • Glue stick

  • Balloon

  • Scissors

  • Pencil

  • Construction paper

  • Tissue paper or Kleenex

  • Cardboard


Instructions:

  • Begin by cutting a 7′′x 7′′ square piece of cardboard.

  • With a pencil, draw the outline of a butterfly on a piece of tissue. Make sure it's not bigger than your square. Cut out the butterfly and set it on the cardboard piece without gluing it down.

  • Draw just the butterfly's body on construction paper and cut it out. Attach it to the center of the butterfly and glue it down. To keep the wings from flying away, make sure it overhangs the tissue onto the cardboard. To show the effects of static electricity, the wings must be loose.

  • Draw on eyes and antennas for your butterfly if you like.

  • Fill the balloon with air and tie it.

  • Rub the balloon through your hair to create static electricity. Hold the balloon near the butterfly's head. It should be near but not touching the butterfly. As the balloon moves closer and further away, the wings should droop and lift.



Bending Water

Materials:

  • Running water

  • Piece of fabric or your shirt

  • A comb


Instructions:

  • For 40 seconds, massage the comb's surface with the fabric.

  • Turn on the faucet to create a stream of water.

  • Place the comb next to the water and watch as the water stream bends.




Salt & Pepper Sort

Materials:

  • Salt

  • Pepper

  • Thick straw

  • Piece of fabric or your shirt


Instructions:

  • Mix one teaspoon of pepper and salt.

  • For 40 seconds, rub the straw on the cloth.

  • Place the straw on top of the mixture. If you hold the pepper over the right areas, it should leap and stick to the straw.














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